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Malakia Logan

Real Name: Malakia Zali Logan
Nicknames: Kia
Location: Greenwood, South Carolina
Date: May 15, 1988

Bio[]

Occupation: Student
Date of Birth: August 1, 1979
Height: 4'2"
Weight: 60 lbs.
Marital Status: Single
Characteristics: African-American female, born with two holes in her heart.

Case[]

Details: On the evening of May 15, 1988, eight-year-old Malakia Logan and her sister went to play in the basketball court of a park near their apartment in Greenwood, South Carolina. At around 8:15pm, Malakia left on her bicycle and headed back home, which was just 300 yards away. She never arrived and was never seen again. Her bike was later found near the apartment office. Her case remains unsolved.
Suspects: Witnesses reported seeing a stranger near the basketball court shortly before Malakia vanished. He was described as white, blond, and pockmarked. He was believed to be driving a dark, older-model Chevrolet Monte Carlo. He has never been located.
Extra Notes: This case first aired on the January 24, 1990 episode along with three other missing children cases: Leticia Hernandez, Jessica Gutierrez, and David Borer.
Results: Unresolved. On October 1, 1990, Malakia's remains were found in a wooded area on U.S. Forest Service property in Newberry County. However, they were not positively identified until 1998, ten years after she vanished. DNA testing confirmed her identity.
In November 2002, fifty-year-old Charles Wade Hampton was charged with murder, abduction, and sexual misconduct in relation to Malakia's case. He confessed to her murder and the rape and murders of at least two other people. However, he later recanted. At the time, he was serving time for "peeping Tom" crimes. He had been a suspect in Malakia's case since 1996. However, in June 2007, the charges against him were dropped. DNA testing ruled him out in one of the other murders, and investigators did not have any evidence to corroborate his confession to Malakia's murder.
However, Hampton did plead guilty to obstruction of justice and was sentenced to eight years in prison. Prosecutors noted that they could charge him again if new evidence would surface.
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